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Resources & References

Professional Resources

Association of Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC)
http://www.apic.org

American College of Gastroenterology (ACG)
http://www.gi.org

American Society of Clinical Pathology
http://www.ascp.org

Mayo Clinic
http://www.mayoclinic.com

Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA)
http://www.shea-online.org

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
http://www.cdc.gov

Commission on Laboratory Accreditation (COLA)
http://www.cola.org

National Credentialing Agency for Laboratory Personnel (NCALP)
http://www.ascp.org/FunctionalNavigation/certification.aspx

References

  1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Surveillance for foodborne disease outbreaks—United States, 2006. MMWR. 2009;58(22):609-615. Accessed December 15, 2009
  2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Bacterial foodborne and diarrheal disease national case surveillance. Annual Report, 2005. Atlanta, GA: US Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; 2007.
  3. World Health Organization (WHO). Fact Sheet Number 399: Food safety and foodborne illness. Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organization; 2014. Accessed November, 2014.
  4. Nataro JP, Kaper JB. Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli. Clin Microbiol Rev. 1998;11(1):142-201.
  5. Todar K. Pathogenic E. coli. Todar’s Online Textbook of Bacteriology.
  6. Johnson KE, Thorpe CM, Sears CL. The emerging clinical importance of non-O157 shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli. Clin Infect Dis. 2006;43:1587-1595
  7. Cleary TG. The role of shiga-toxin–producing Escherichia coli in hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome. Semin Pediatr Infect Dis. 2004;15:260-285.
  8. Galanis E. Campylobacter and bacterial gastroenteritis. CMAJ. 2007;177(6):570-571.
  9. CDC. Griffin PM. Update on infections with and clinical lab guidelines for Shiga toxin producing E. coli (STEC) in the United States. 2009. Accessed February 24, 2010.
  10. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Division of foodborne, bacterial and mycotic diseases (DFBMD). Campylobacter - General Information
  11. Javid MH, Ahmed SH. Campylobacter infections. emedicine. Updated July 28th, 2015.
  12. Gillespie IA, O’Brien SJ, Frost JA, et al. A case-case comparison of Campylobacter coli and Campylobacter jejuni infection: a tool for generating hypotheses. Emerg Infect Dis. 2002;8(9):937-942.
  13. Wassenaar TM. Toxin production by Campylobacter spp. Clin Microbiol Rev. 1997;10(3):466-476.
  14. Hickey TE, McVeigh AL, Scott DA, et al. Campylobacter jejuni cytolethal distending toxin mediates release of interleukin-8 from intestinal epithelial cells. Infect Immunol. 2000;68(12):6535-6541.
  15. US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Bad Bug Book: Foodborne Pathogenic Microorganisms and Natural Toxins Handbook. Updated October 2014.
  16. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Recommendations for diagnosis of Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli infections by clinical laboratories. MMWR. 2009;68:1-14. Accessed March 18, 2010.
  17. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Diagnosis and management of foodborne illness: a primer for physicians and other health care professionals. MMWR. 2004;53(RR-4)1-33. Accessed December 15, 2009.
  18. Madappa T, Go CHU. Escherichia coli infections. emedicine. Accessed December 9, 2009.
  19. Ang JY, Nachman S. Campylobacter infections. emedicine. Accessed December 10, 2009.
  20. Paton JC, Paton AW. Pathogenesis and diagnosis of shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli infections. Clin Microbiol Rev. 1998;11(3):450-479.
  21. Kehl KS, Havens P, Behnke CE, Acheson DWK. Evaluation of the Premier EHEC assay for detection of shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli. J Clin Microbiol. 1997;35(8):2051-2054.
  22. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Importance of culture confirmation of shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli infection as illustrated by outbreaks of gastroenteritis—New York and North Carolina, 2005. MMWR. 2006;55(38):1042-1045. Accessed February 15, 2010.
  23. Guerrant RL, Van Gilder T, Steiner TS, et al. Practice guidelines for the management of infectious diarrhea. Clin Infect Dis. 2001;32(1):331-351.

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ELISA for the detection of Shiga toxins in stool specimens or from culture ELISA for the detection of Shiga toxins in stool specimens or from culture.
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Rapid, easy-to-use test for detection of E. coli Shiga toxins 1 and 2 Rapid, easy-to-use test for detection of E. coli Shiga toxins 1 and 2.
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Rapid immunoassay for detection of E. coli O157:H7 Rapid immunoassay for detection of E. coli O157:H7 in stool specimens or culture.
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ELISA for the detection of Campylobacter antigens ELISA for the detection of Campylobacter antigens
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Rapid test for the detection of specific Campylobacter antigens Rapid test for the detection of specific Campylobacter antigens in human stool.
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